The bounty from Athens knitters and crocheters!

As a part of GPA Tanzania, we will be interacting with local schools, including an orphanage in Moshi.  Dr. Moshi (yes, I think the names are connected) gave me a challenge–teach some of the orphans to crochet.

I have taught very few newbies to crochet.  My dear friend asked me to teach her once, so I bought her a book and a hook and offered to help once she taught herself the basics.  She has since made a lovely baby blanket.  The tiny little newbie details are difficult for me to convey.  How do I hold a hook?  How do I hold the yarn?  Where the heck does this thing go?

But I firmly believe in the power of crochet.  It is an outlet for creative energy as well as the nervous fidgety energy some of us have when sitting still for too long.  It enables people to clothe their family and furnish their homes with their own creations.  It can provide a source of income.  I am inspired by the work Krochet Kids has done in Uganda–I don’t aspire to create a self-supporting women’s group selling items internationally, but I think their success story shows what crochet can do.

Language will be interesting.   I know that “to crochet” in Kiswahili is kushona.  So is “to knit,” “to sew,” and “to weave.”  There’s a bounty of names for “hook”–hangue, kingoe, kiopoo, kombo, kota, and kulabu.  I’m not sure which is appropriate (I hope it’s kiopoo; I like the way it sounds).  Never mind the vocabulary for yarn over, single crochet, slip stitch, etc.  Depending on their age, many of the kids will have some English.  But then there are the discrepancies between American and British crochet terminology when they start to read patterns.

I’m not sure about the availability of tools or yarn.  There’s tons of crocheters in Kenya, but I don’t think knitting and crocheting permeated the culture in Tanzania as much since the British were not as present. The local machine-knitters import their yarn from Kenya.  Hooks could be carved, but I won’t have time for that.  Through the generosity of the knitting and crocheting community in Athens, GA, I will have ample hooks and yarn to get the kids started. Asanteni sana, marafiki zangu!  Thank you so much, my friends!  I hope my suitcase is big enough!

I accept this challenge.  I once taught a 10-year-old Kenyan boy to play Uno Hearts with my minimal Kiswahili and his minimal English.  It just takes a sense of humor and some love.  I can’t wait to meet the kids and share my love for crochet.  We’ll all try our level best and we’ll have some yarn fun.

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